SEGEDUNUM ROMAN FORT

Main site

Main site

SEGEDUNUM the Roman Fort at Wallsend is where the Roman Wall commences its journey through Northumberland and Cumberland. Also Known as Hadrian’s Wall it was built to keep out the Scottish raiders. The first part of the wall was built at Pons Aelius (modern day Newcastle Upon Tyne) and continued in a westerly direction and it was not until a few years later that it was extended east to the river Tyne. Hadrian built the wall of Turf but later it was replaced with stone when Antonine took over, so I suppose it should be called Antonines Wall. At regular intervals along the wall Hadrian built milecastles and every so often, a larger fort where soldiers and cavalry were stationed. Segedunum was the first of these larger Forts, built at the eastern extremities of the Wall. Segedunum is now a museum with only the foundations visible at this time but there is also a rebuilt portion of the Wall, just as it would have been in the second century C.E. The garrison of 600 was comprised of 480 infantry and 120 cavalry. Excavations have found evidence of a vicus or civil habitations to the north of the fort that would probably be the origin of the village of Wallsend. The Romans were forced to leave the fort around 400C.E., leaving it to the local inhabitants, who of course aquired the stones used to build it for their own buildings.

The photographs show the iconic 123 foot  high viewing tower and views from the tower as well as museum exhibits and the reconstructed Roman Bath-house (fully working) and the tiny Roman Garden. Segedunum is a ‘Learning Museum’ and regularly hosts bus trips from schools in the area.

Bibliography: Wikipaedia and my own knowledge

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Reconstructed Wall

Segedunum_Roman_Fort_and_Baths_-_Wikipaedia

Main site and Bathhouse

DSCF1473

View Of Wallsend from the Tower

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Reconstructed Roman Wall

DSCF1474_edited-1

Museum 1

DSCF1475

Model of the Fort

DSCF1477

Museum 2

DSCF1480

Bust of Emperor Hadrian

DSCF1482

Museum 3

DSCF1486

Museum 4

DSCF1490

Viewing Tower 1

DSCF1491

Monument containing three Roma Plaques

DSCF1493

Viewing Tower from the front

DSCF1495

Roman Bathhouse

DSCF1500

The Roman Garden. It would be mainly used for growing herbs

DSCF1501

In the Roman Garden

DSCF1502

In the Bathhouse

DSCF1503

The Bathhouse ceiling

DSCF1507

Bathhouse 2

DSCF1519

Site of the fort with the viewing Tower in the background

DSCF1522

Close up of the viewing area of the Tower

DSCF1524

The reconstructed Wall 2

DSCF1525

Reconstructed Wall 3

DSCF1526

Reconstructed Wall 4

DSCF1530

Walking on the Wall (Roman soldiers only!)

DSCF1531

Wall Walkway

DSCF1542

Viewing Tower – You can see the people viewing

DSCF1547

Viewing Tower and entrance

File0006

Wall and Milecastle (courtesy Sylvia Blakeley)

GE DIGITAL CAMERA

Segedunum Roman Fort, as it would have looked in its heyday.

GE DIGITAL CAMERA

Museum: Scull found locally

GE DIGITAL CAMERA

Roman Standards

GE DIGITAL CAMERA

Roman gold and silver plate

GE DIGITAL CAMERA

Roman wall paintings

GE DIGITAL CAMERA

In the Bathhouse

GE DIGITAL CAMERA

Bathhouse changing area

GE DIGITAL CAMERA

Front view of the Roman Garden

GE DIGITAL CAMERA

Relax on a seat in the garden

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Emperor Hadrian

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Museum 4

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Museum 5

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Close up of the standards

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Museum 6

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

‘Alas poor Yorick’

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Altar stone

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Egyptian Exhibition 1

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Egyptian Exhibition 2 – Mummy

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Pharoaoh Tutankhamun

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The four canopic jars.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Inside the sarcophagus

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Preparing a body for mummification

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Another Bathhouse room

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Bathhouse

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A religious niche on the wall of the bathhouse

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In the Bathhouse

   

This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to SEGEDUNUM ROMAN FORT

  1. Stephen Boka says:

    Interesting piece. It looks like Newcastle has some interesting historical sites!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s